customer satisfaction survey

Why You Should Care About Your Customer Effort Score

Survey Tips

Do you know your customer effort score? Do you have a grasp of what it is?

Your customer effort score (CES) measures what your customers think about how easy or difficult your business makes it for them to complete an action.

The CES measures how many hoops your customers have to jump through to get what they need. For example, are they looking for info on your website and can’t find it? Or, are they getting a busy signal each time they call customer service?

One study says it is 25% more predictive of customer loyalty than the next best metric. Combined with the Net Promoter Score and Customer Satisfaction Score, you should have a working knowledge of how your customers feel about you.

Because it’s so important, in this article, we look at why you should care about your customer effort score.

The Customer Effort Survey

First, let’s look at how you get this information.

The CES survey involves a single question that is scored on a scale from one to seven.

The question might look like this:  X (your name) made it easy for me to get what I needed (or find an answer, or some variable of this).

The answer options are: strongly agree, agree, somewhat agree, neutral, somewhat disagree, disagree, strongly disagree.

If you get a negative score, you can use your survey to send them to another question that is empathetic and looks something like this: “It looks like we could have done a better job helping you. Please let us know more about your experience.

You would then list seven options underneath for them to click on. For example, answers might be: I was on hold too long, your website was confusing, no one answered my question, etc.

Now let’s look at why it matters.

You Can Improve Your Service

Using your CES data can help you improve your customer satisfaction. It can help you get your customer service right the first time, so you don’t have unsatisfied customers.

If your score is low, you want to train your staff to not only respond quickly but to respond with empathy and knowledge. If they aren’t trained correctly, they will fall short.

The CES helps you learn where your staff and your company fall short and where you can improve.

You Can Improve Your Speed

Customers waiting too long on hold? Or, are they spending a lot of time on your website and not finding answers?

Speed is so important in the 21st century. In a world of immediacy, people are not willing to wait.

So, surprise them and speed things up.

If your CES shows that customers are waiting too long, you can add staff and improve your processes.

You Can Improve Your Options

Oftentimes, people are happy to solve their problems on their own, but they need the right information to do so.

You can help your customer service process by exploring your self service tools.

Your most modern customers will be glad to look for some answers on their own. Make these easy to find, and always offer the option of talking to a person, too.

Final Thoughts

If your customers have to expend too much effort to get what they want and need from you, they aren’t going to return.

Effort is a good predictor of how loyal your customers are and will be in the future.

Your customer effort score can help you understand where your company, products/services, and staff fall short so you can improve. (tweet this)

Today’s marketplace is all about providing the best possible customer service, and that includes how much effort your customers have to spend to get what they want.

When you reduce their effort, you increase their loyalty.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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When to Ask NPS Score

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Have you ever wondered when to ask NPS score? When should you send this survey to customers? We’ll answer that in the article so you get good responses.

NPS Score: Why It’s Good To Use

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The Net Promoter (NPS) Score is the single best question to ask respondents because it not only helps you gauge customer loyalty, but it helps you learn whether your customers appreciate you so much they’d tell other people about you.

The NPS question is this: “How likely is it that you would recommend our business to someone else.”

Let’s look at the NPS score and why it’s good to use.

It Measures Repeat Business

With one simple question, you can determine if your customers will shop with you again.

It’s a great tool for forecasting your business growth potential.

The NPS score measures the likelihood of repeat business while at the same time measuring the probability of new business. (tweet this) For example, if a customer responds high on the positivity scale, you know they’ll be back, and they’ll recommend you to others. 

It’s Easy to Implement

What could be easier for respondents than a one question survey?

The NPS Score is simple, straightforward and lightning quick for your survey takers. All you want to know is how likely they are to recommend your business to a friend. 

It Helps You Track Change

Let’s say that your first NPS Score didn’t reveal great results.

You go back to the drawing board and fine tune your customer service policies. You train your staff and provide ongoing refreshers. Finally, you begin instilling the thank you culture into your business model.

It’s six months later, and you send out another survey, and the results are much improved.

By using your NPS Score, you can survey customers twice a year to see if your improvements are working. If they aren’t, you can again make changes. 

Final Thoughts

Start the process in your business today and use the Net Promoter Score as part of your overall marketing strategy and business growth plan.

You’ll gain valuable insights about the customer experience and learn where you need to improve.

Use the NPS Score to improve your customer service and your processes for the absolute best customer relationships and to ultimately grow your business.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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10 Questions for Your Guest Evaluation

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Sending a survey after someone stays at your hotel or bed and breakfast is a fairly commonplace marketing tool.

If you aren’t currently sending a guest evaluation, or if you’d like to give your survey a refresh, this article includes 10 questions for your guest evaluation.

These are questions you can use to see where you are excelling, or perhaps where you can improve your business.

Your reputation depends on what people are saying about you, and if you don’t know how they really feel, you have nothing on which to base your improvements. (tweet this) This is why a guest evaluation survey is so important for the hospitality field.

With many of the questions below, you can choose to offer open-ended questions as well as rating questions or closed-ended questions where users can choose more than one answer.

Consider what you really want to know before deciding on the question type.

#1: Why Did You Choose to Stay at This Hotel?

By asking this question, you get a good idea of whether it was an online search, price, word of mouth, reviews, repeat customer or something else.

Provide choices for your customers and let them check as many as they’d like because it could be multiple reasons.

#2: Tell Us About the Front Desk Staff?

These employees provide the first impression for your guests, and they set the tone for the entire stay.

Let respondents rate the front desk staff. If the response was negative, provide another question so they can say why.

#3: How was the Check-In Process?

This question lends itself to an initial closed-ended question.

You might ask respondents how satisfied they were with the check-in process with choices like: very satisfied, satisfied, neutral, dissatisfied and very dissatisfied.

Yet, you could employ conditional logic to gather more information in the form of an open-ended question.

For example, if they answered satisfied or very satisfied, you would send them to a question asking them why.

If they answered on the opposite end, you certainly want to know what happened, so you’d ask for details.

#4: Was Your Room Clean Upon Arrival?

This is a simple question and usually, a yes or no answer is just fine.

But, again, you want to employ conditional logic if survey respondents answer with a no response.

Push further to find out what wasn’t up to par. This helps you better train your housekeeping staff to meet the needs of your guests.

With regard to clean rooms, it’s worth noting that this is one of the most important items to your hotel guests when it comes to choosing accommodations.

#5: How Did the Housekeeping Staff Do During Your Stay?

With this question, you would use a rating scale.

For example, your question might look like this:

The housekeeping staff did an excellent job cleaning my room.

o Strongly agree

o Agree

o Neutral/Not sure

o Disagree

o Strongly disagree

If they answer that they disagree, move them on to another question so you can learn about the problems they encountered.

#6: Did You Use Any of the Amenities? If so, which ones?

This is an important question because you really want to know if they used your business center, swimming pool, hot tub, exercise room, restaurant, etc.

So, the best way to do this question is to provide a list of all of your amenities so they can check the boxes of all that apply.

You could follow this question up with a “Why didn’t you use X amenity,” if you want to learn how important individual ones are to your hotel guests.

#7: Was Your Bed Comfortable?

This is another important item for your hotel guests. While it might not be what makes them make the initial reservation, you can bet that it is a determining factor when they decide the following:

  • Whether or not to return to your property.
  • What kind of online review they’ll write.
  • If they recommend you to others.

So, ask this question. Then, take a look at your results over a few months. If the answer is most often a no, then you want to work new beds into your next budget.

#8: Did You Enjoy Breakfast?

If you serve breakfast, this is an important question to ask because it’s vital to the overall impression your guests have of your property.

While this can be a yes or no question, you certainly want to follow it up with conditional logic.

The end goal is to find what they enjoyed about the breakfast. You might find no one likes oatmeal, so you can remove it from your offerings.

You also want to know what they like to ensure it stays on your menu.

#9: How was the Check-Out Process?

Just like the question you asked about the check-in process, you want to know about the check-out process.

This includes things like:

  • Was your bill accurate?
  • Did you check out online?
  • Did you go to the front desk to check out?
  • How was the front desk staff?
  • Were there enough luggage racks for you?
  • Did you find the parking adequate for ease of getting your bags to the car?

#10: How Likely Are You to Recommend Our Hotel to Others?

Finally, this is the ultimate question on your list. This is the meat of your guest evaluation.

Why? Because when all is said and done, you want to know if you succeeded in making your guest’s stay so wonderful that they will recommend you to others.

This question is what makes up your Net Promotor Score. It’s what lets you gauge the loyalty of your customer.

Did you go far enough to build a great relationship?

If the answer to this question is less than satisfactory, you have a problem on your hands and one that must be solved quickly.

Final Thoughts

The hospitality business is based on reputation, digital reviews and even word of mouth.

To make sure that your hotel or bed and breakfast is getting a five-star rating and reputation online, you want to know what your guests think. The best way to do this is through a guest evaluation survey.

The 10 questions included here will help you determine whether or not your property is making the grade. You will get insight on where you excel and where you can improve.

In the hospitality business, anything under a four-star rating will give your guests pause, so it pays to conduct a guest evaluation so you can make quick, positive corrections to ensure five stars show up for you each time.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free SurveyTown trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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What Is A Good Net Promoter Score?

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Your Net Promoter Score (NPS) measures the experience customers have with your business. It also predicts your company’s growth potential.

When measuring the customer experience using the NPS, you want to answer the question, “What is a good Net Promoter Score?”

In this article, we dissect that question and provide you with an answer. First, let’s look at how the score is calculated.

The NPS Calculation

  • Promoters (score 9-10) are loyal enthusiasts that you can expect to keep purchasing from you and referring others which fuels growth.
  • Passives (score 7-8) are satisfied, but they are not enthusiastic customers. They are vulnerable to your competition.
  • Detractors (score 0-6) are your unhappy customers who can damage your brand and hinder growth through their negative word-of-mouth.

You subtract the percentage of detractors from the percentage of promoters to get your Net Promoter Score. The top score you can get is 100, and that’s only if everyone is a promoter.

What’s a Good Score?

So, you want to know what your Net Promoter Score should be. While this is a simple enough question, the answer is, “It depends.”

It is widely accepted that a score below 0 means you have work to do, a score of 50 is excellent, and a score of 70 and above is top notch.

It’s also worth noting that any positive score means you have more promoters than detractors. (tweet this)

That being said, your score depends on your industry and the region of the country you live in. It also hinges on your customers – their age and income as well as other demographics. Your NPS is based on how long your customers have been associated with your business.

To really understand your score, compare it to the score of others in your industry. If you are consistently scoring higher than your competitors, you’re doing something right and are set for growth.

Use your research as a benchmark. This helps you gauge the success of the customer experience you provide your customers.

Final Thoughts

The bottom line is that your score should reflect your efforts at the overall customer experience.

If you’re working hard to improve your service and relationship with your customers, it stands to reason that your score will be positive.

If you find you have a negative score, then it’s time to create a customer service strategy.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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How To Use Surveys To Gauge Customer Loyalty

Survey Tips

Have you heard about the Net Promotor Score (NPS)?

In this article, we look at the NPS and how to use surveys to gauge customer loyalty.

Defining the NPS

This is a tool you can use to gauge the loyalty of your customer relationships. The score is based on the responses to one question: “How likely is it that you would recommend our company/product/service to a friend or colleague?”

The scores are created like this:

  • Promoters have a score of 9 to 10 (on a 0-10 scale) and are likely to buy more and recommend you to others.
  • Those with a score of 0 to 6 are called Detractors and aren’t considered value-creating customers.
  • People who respond with a 7 or 8 are called Passives, and they fall in the middle.

You calculate the net promoter score by subtracting the Detractors from the Promotors. (Passives count only towards your total of respondents which decreases the percentage of Detractors and Promotors.)

Using a Survey

A customer survey is a great way to measure customer loyalty and your NPS.

When you use a survey, you can quickly tell exactly how your customers view you.

You can then use your results to enhance your business and increase customer loyalty.

Follow these four steps when using surveys to gauge customer loyalty:

  1. Create a survey that asks customers how likely they’d be to recommend your company on a scale of 0-10.
  2. Analyze your data using the NPS scale mentioned above.
  3. Reach back out to the customers who expressed the most loyalty towards you. Continue to nurture them through your marketing channels to increase the likelihood they’ll be your brand advocates.
  4. Follow up with customers who are the least likely to recommend you (or not at all) to find out what you can do differently.

Final Thoughts

Are you currently using the NPS to determine your company’s rate of customer satisfaction? Have you thought about sending a survey to gauge customer loyalty?

Because your relationship with your customers is so important to your growth and retention rates, it’s a good idea to check in and see just what they’re thinking. (tweet this)

Customer loyalty is key to your business growth. Loyal customers shop with you again and again. They are your brand ambassadors.

Measure your company’s customer loyalty through a survey to learn how well you’re doing or where you can improve.  This is a key indicator of potential growth.

Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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