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NPS Score Why It's Good To Use
Survey Tips

NPS Score: Why It’s Good To Use

Drag and drop survey creation  – JUST LAUNCHED!
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Drag and drop survey creation – JUST LAUNCHED!

We have just launched some changes to way surveys are created by introducing a new drag and drop interface for questions.  This interface reduces the number of clicks needed to add questions into a survey as well as allows you a better vantage point to “see” how your survey is coming together while you create it.  Here’s a guide to the major changes.

Drag questions into place

First main change is that you now see all your questions types in a list on the left.  You can then choose among the list, select them and then drag and drop them into your survey area which is the main area on the right.

 

Inline editing

Once you drop your question in the main survey editing area, the dialog to add in your question text or set your choices will appear right there inline.  You can then save your settings and the question will appear right there.  This change saves several clicks back and forth between pages.

 

See your survey as you build it

With these changes you can now get a better view of your survey as you build it.  After you save your questions they appear in the main editing area so you can see how they will look in the final published survey.

Actions are now exposed via hovering

The Edit, Copy, Move and Delete actions on survey questions are now exposed when you hover over the questions.

Conclusion

We hope we have made the survey creation process even easier our new drag-and-drop interface for creating surveys.  This new interface for creating surveys will reduce the number of clicks and give you a better view of your survey as you create it.

Happy Surveying!

10 Questions for Your Guest Evaluation
Survey Tips

10 Questions for Your Guest Evaluation

Sending a survey after someone stays at your hotel or bed and breakfast is a fairly commonplace marketing tool.

If you aren’t currently sending a guest evaluation, or if you’d like to give your survey a refresh, this article includes 10 questions for your guest evaluation.

These are questions you can use to see where you are excelling, or perhaps where you can improve your business.

Your reputation depends on what people are saying about you, and if you don’t know how they really feel, you have nothing on which to base your improvements. (tweet this) This is why a guest evaluation survey is so important for the hospitality field.

With many of the questions below, you can choose to offer open-ended questions as well as ratings questions or closed-ended questions where users can choose more than one answer.

Consider what you really want to know before deciding on the question type.

#1: Why Did You Choose to Stay at This Hotel?

By asking this question, you get a good idea of whether it was an online search, price, word of mouth, reviews, repeat customer or something else.

Provide choices for your customers and let them check as many as they’d like because it could be multiple reasons.

#2: Tell Us About the Front Desk Staff?

These employees provide the first impression for your guests, and they set the tone for the entire stay.

Let respondents rate the front desk staff. If the response was negative, provide another question so they can say why.

#3: How was the Check-In Process?

This question lends itself to an initial closed ended question.

You might ask respondents how satisfied they were with the check-in process with choices like: very satisfied, satisfied, neutral, dissatisfied and very dissatisfied.

Yet, you could employ conditional logic to gather more information in the form of an open-ended question.

For example, if they answered satisfied or very satisfied, you would send them to a question asking them why.

If they answered on the opposite end, you certainly want to know what happened, so you’d ask for details.

#4: Was Your Room Clean Upon Arrival?

This is a simple question and usually a yes or no answer is just fine.

But, again, you want to employ conditional logic if survey respondents answer with a no response.

Push further to find out what wasn’t up to par. This helps you better train your housekeeping staff to meet the needs of your guests.

With regard to clean rooms, it’s worth noting that this is one of the most important items to your hotel guests when it comes to choosing accommodations.

#5: How Did the Housekeeping Staff Do During Your Stay?

With this question, you would use a ratings scale.

For example, your question might look like this:

The housekeeping staff did an excellent job cleaning my room.

o Strongly agree

o Agree

o Neutral/Not sure

o Disagree

o Strongly disagree

If they answer that they disagree, move them on to another question so you can learn about the problems they encountered.

#6: Did You Use Any of the Amenities? If so, which ones?

This is an important question, because you really want to know if they used your business center, swimming pool, hot tub, exercise room, restaurant, etc.

So, the best way to do this question is to provide a list of all of your amenities so they can check the boxes of all that apply.

You could follow this question up with a “Why didn’t you use X amenity,” if you want to learn how important individual ones are to your hotel guests.

#7: Was Your Bed Comfortable?

This is another important item to your hotel guests. While it might not be what makes them make the initial reservation, you can bet that it is a determining factor when they decide the following:

  • Whether or not to return to your property.
  • What kind of online review they’ll write.
  • If they recommend you to others.

So, ask this question. Then, take a look at your results over a few months. If the answer is most often a no, then you want to work new beds into your next budget.

#8: Did You Enjoy Breakfast?

If you serve breakfast, this is an important question to ask because it’s vital to the overall impression your guests have of your property.

While this can be a yes or no question, you certainly want to follow it up with conditional logic.

The end goal is to find what they enjoyed about the breakfast. You might find no one likes oatmeal, so you can remove it from your offerings.

You also want to know what they like to ensure it stays on your menu.

#9: How was the Check-Out Process?

Just like the question you asked about the check-in process, you want to know about the check-out process.

This includes things like:

  • Was your bill accurate?
  • Did you check out online?
  • Did you go to the front desk to check out?
  • How was the front desk staff?
  • Were there enough luggage racks for you?
  • Did you find the parking adequate for ease of getting your bags to the car?

#10: How Likely Are You to Recommend Our Hotel to Others?

Finally, this is the ultimate question on your list. This is the meat of your guest evaluation.

Why? Because when all is said and done, you want to know if you succeeded in making your guest’s stay so wonderful that they will recommend you to others.

This question is what makes up your Net Promotor Score. It’s what lets you gauge the loyalty of your customer.

Did you go far enough to build a great relationship?

If the answer to this question is less than satisfactory, you have a problem on your hands and one that must be solved quickly.

Final Thoughts

The hospitality business is based on reputation, digital reviews and even word of mouth.

To make sure that your hotel or bed and breakfast is getting a five-star rating and reputation online, you want to know what your guests think. The best way to do this is through a guest evaluation survey.

The 10 questions included here will help you determine whether or not your property is making the grade. You will get insight on where you excel and where you can improve.

In the hospitality business, anything under a four-star rating will give your guests pause, so it pays to conduct a guest evaluation so you can make quick, positive corrections to ensure five stars show up for you each time.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image:  Paul Bence and rawpixel.com on Unsplash

How to Achieve Balance in A Survey
Survey Tips

How to Achieve Balance in A Survey

The purpose of a good survey is to dig deep to learn what your customers really think about your products or services and your customer service.

You want to provide a survey to your customers that not only meets their usability needs, but one that meets yours.

The results you are looking for are in-depth and reliable. To do this, you must create a balanced survey that asks the right questions.

In this article, we look at how to achieve balance in a survey.

Watch for Bias

Your first step in achieving balance in a survey is writing open-ended survey questions that avoid bias.

This means staying away from questions that bias respondents towards one answer.

Biased questions ruin your survey’s reliability because the answers you receive aren’t accurate. 

What does a biased question look like? Here’s an example:

We love our new cleaning solution. How wonderful do you think it is?

While this may be an extreme example of bias, you can see how this pressures respondents to come up with a positive answer.

This is not only off-putting to respondents, but it skews your data.

One way to fix this question is to write one like this: How does our new cleaning solution work for you?

This puts the focus on the cleaning solution, and leaves respondents able to answer positively or negatively.

By eliminating any biased wording, you take out your own opinions and leave the answer wide open for respondents.

Your other option would be to re-frame the question, while adding another option so your survey remains balanced. Consider these two questions:

How helpful is our new cleaning solution?

What about our new cleaning solution hasn’t met your needs?

On their own, these questions are biased. When set side-by-side, they provide balance.

Provide a Balanced Scale

Your next step is using a balanced scale when creating your closed-ended survey questions.

When posing questions on a balanced scale, you ask respondents to answer a question based on a balanced ratings system. For example, your question might be:

Rate your experience with our new cleaning solution:

The choices you provide are very dissatisfied, dissatisfied, neither satisfied or dissatisfied, satisfied, very satisfied. 

This is a balanced scale because there are two options on each side of neutral – one moving in the positive direction and one moving in the negative direction.

In a balanced scale, both the negative and positive categories must be equal. If they aren’t, you might end up with survey bias because you are leading respondents to a particular answer.

The mid-point must be between to equal sides to avoid “forcing” respondents to answer in a way they don’t really feel. This can create a sub-conscious bias.

Keep your scale balanced so you don’t get inaccurate results or misleading data that ruins the accuracy of your survey. (tweet this)

How do you know what kind of scale to use? First, more categories aren’t always the best scenario. Give respondents too many choices, and you again run the risk of unreliable data because the choices are so overwhelming, the respondent just picks an answer.

When it comes to balanced scales, less is often better as long as there is enough difference between the choices, and the positives and negatives are balanced.

Your categories need to be distinctive to avoid data problems, but not so far apart that respondents wished there was another choice. 

Final Thoughts

For the most reliable and usable data, keep your survey balanced.

Whether you take all bias out of your questions, or you offer two alternatives, one positive and one negative, you allow your respondents the freedom to answer truthfully about how they really feel.

To achieve balance in a survey, keep all of your own thoughts and opinions out of your questions so you can get true and accurate responses.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image:  Jeremy Thomas on Unsplash

 

SurveyTown and Slack
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Create automatic Slack messages when you receive a survey response

Slack is a workplace collaboration tool that has grown exponentially and many companies use it to facilitate communication.

Imagine if you wanted to receive a Slack message when you receive a new survey response.  Well, you can!  For example you could use this feature to alert support team members to new responses to Net Promoter Score (NPS). Or you could alert team members when someone has filled out a survey describing their experience or preferences.

Using Zapier, you can create an automatic slack message after you receive a survey response in SurveyTown.  Its fun and easy to setup.

SurveyTown alert inside of Slack

The three things you need are …

  1. SurveyTown account (Professional level, so you can get API Keys)
  2. Slack account
  3. Zapier account (free or paid)

 

Step 1 – Connect your SurveyTown account to Zapier

Login to Zapier and connect SurveyTown account.  Go to Connected Accounts, search for SurveyTown.  It will ask you for your API key.  Grab your API key from SurveyTown and copy and paste it into Zapier.

Step 2 – Connect your Slack account to Zapier

Login to Zapier account.  Go to Connect Acounts and search for Slack.  The connection process involves giving permission for Zapier to be able to post messages to your Slack (among other things).

Step 3 – Setup a Zap!

This step is to create the connection between SurveyTown and Slack.  This involves setting up the trigger and the action.  So we want a new survey response to create a message in Slack.  So the trigger is the survey response and the action is the posting of the message to Slack.

When you setup your SurveyTown trigger it will look into your account for active surveys.  Choose survey which is receiving the responses you want posted to Slack. (NOTE: You will need to have at least one recent survey response in there to run a test.)

Create SurveyTown Trigger in Zapier

Next you setup the action which is posting the message in Slack.  When you set up the action you will have the option to choose to post to Slack a “Direct” message or a “Channel” message.  If you choose a “Direct” message you will need to choose you to send the message to and if you choose “Channel” which channel you will send the message to.

Create a Slack action with SurveyTown trigger in Zapier

 

You will then write in the message you want sent.  You can also add into the message a question response.  So for example you can write in the NPS score you just received into the message.

From there you follow the steps, press “Finish”, name your Zap and then activate it.

Your Zaps will run automatically but if you want to submit a survey response and see it in Slack, you can force a Zap to run by going to the dashboard and clicking “Run”.

Here’s a full demo of the SurveyTown <> Slack setup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to insert a survey question into an email
General, Product Information, Survey Tips

How to insert a survey question into an email

At SurveyTown, we give you the HTML you can copy and paste into an email you send to a customer.

See how to embed a survey question in an email.

This means that your question will show in the email itself, allowing your customer to one-click in the email and give their response.

There are four types of question types that you can embed into your emails.

  1. Rating
  2. Net Promoter Score
  3. Radio
  4. Picture (choose one)

The process of embedding is to go into the “Promote” tab, and then clicking on “Questions” from there you can copy and paste the HTML that you can embed into an email.

We created a full video that guides you on how to put the HTML into an email.

Happy Surveying!

The Pros & Cons Of Letting Survey Takers Remain Anonymous
Survey Tips

The Pros & Cons of Letting Survey Takers Remain Anonymous

You’ve created an engaging survey and paid attention to all the best practices. It’s time to send it out, and suddenly you aren’t sure what to do.

Should you require respondents to leave their names, or should you let them remain nameless?

In this article, we look at the pros and cons of letting survey takers remain anonymous.

Pros of Anonymous Surveys

You’ll often find that anonymous surveys can provide for more honest feedback.

The nature of a nameless survey means that respondents can answer freely without fear of reprisals or embarrassment.

Anonymous surveys work well for topics that are deeply personal and allow people to respond openly and honestly.

Cons of Anonymous Surveys

On the flip side, anonymous surveys may be less specific. You may find that if negative feedback is involved, it’s broad-based because you can’t follow-up to learn more.

In addition, if the survey is anonymous, you might not have a frame of reference for the respondents’ complaints, so you can’t be completely sure of the whole picture.

Another negative is that respondents don’t have to “own” an anonymous survey. If they have to give their name, they must also be able to stand behind their feedback and defend it.

Without ownership, your data may not always be accurate.

Final Thoughts

Once you’ve weighed the pros and cons of letting survey takers remain anonymous, you can decide which route to take.

If you’re on the fence, consider letting your survey takers decide. Give them the choice of answering their questions openly or anonymously. Do this at the start of the survey for the best results.

Finally, if you’re wondering about survey results, a university study shows that non-anonymous survey respondents are more likely to provide extra detail in their responses as opposed to anonymous responders.

This also shows that feedback quality actually can improve once the anonymity is removed. (tweet this)

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image:  Daniel Montiero