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Harnessing the Power Of Regular Feedback
Survey Tips

Harnessing The Power Of Regular Feedback

How To Interpret Negative Feedback On A Survey
Survey Tips

How To Interpret Negative Feedback On A Survey

No business likes to receive negative feedback. It certainly doesn’t feel good.

But, instead of getting defensive and angry, you can turn it into an opportunity for growth and change.

In this article, we look at how to interpret negative feedback on a survey so you can use it to improve your business.

First, let’s look at some steps you can take to evaluate your data.

Interpret the Data

First, you want to read through all of your survey data. Don’t make immediate conclusions because that comes later.

After the initial reading, you can begin organizing the results.

Next, you want to look for patterns in your data. Your online software can help you do this. See which responses were the most popular and note the outliers.

You should start to see a pattern. For example, perhaps more respondents were happy with one of your products, but not another. This is where you’d find what you needed to fix.

For some people, it helps to view the data in a visual format like graphs or charts. Make sure you’re looking at the data in the way that best helps you understand it.

Finally, decide what responses necessitate action from you and make a plan for taking care of the issues.

Really Listen

Your first step in interpreting any negative feedback is to really listen to what your customers are saying. It’s hard to do this right after you read the feedback.

So, take a step back, breathe and return to review it after you’ve calmed down.

Read the response carefully to make sure you understand exactly what your customer is telling you.

Respond to the Customer

If you know the name of the customer who responded negatively, you should contact the respondent within 24 hours.

It’s usually best to respond with a phone call, but if you don’t know the number, you can send an email.

It will mean a lot to your customer that you took the time to call and make things right.

Your goal is to do everything you can to remedy the situation with your customer. This isn’t the time to be defensive or angry. You want to turn an angry customer into a loyal one by the service you provide.

Make sure your customer knows how much you appreciate his/her taking your survey and providing you with feedback. Ask him to give you more information, then apologize and provide solutions.

Make Changes

Once you’ve analyzed your survey data and compiled both your positive and your negative feedback, you are well-poised to make some changes.

Take the negative feedback and discuss it with your team. Brainstorm ways you can prevent this type of feedback in the future while providing the best customer service possible.

You can also take this one step further and craft an email to your survey respondents, thanking them for completing the survey. Then, you want to let them know what steps you are taking to remedy their issues.

This lets all of your customers know you are serious about the survey and truly value their thoughts and opinions. 

Final Thoughts

Perhaps the most important thing about your survey is that you do something with the results, both negative and positive.

It does you no good to send out a survey and ignore the data.

If things are going great, congratulations. But, don’t stop there. Ask yourself how you can make things even better.

When you get negative feedback, you must respond and take action. This shows your customers that you value their comments. It lets them know that as a business, you intend to improve your service and products.

Once you’ve taken the steps necessary to correct your mistakes, consider sending a second survey.

You can ask your customers specific questions that focus on the negative feedback you received from the first survey to find out if you’ve improved.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image: Jordan Ladikos on Unsplash

 

How To Create A B2B Client Satisfaction Questionnaire
Survey Tips

How to Create A B2B Client Satisfaction Questionnaire

Is the satisfaction of your clients important to your company?

If so, you want to survey them to make sure you’re doing things satisfactorily. You want actionable insights so you can make sure you’re providing your B2B customers the best service, delivery, management and more. (tweet this)

The business-to-business (B2B) survey is a bit different than the regular customer satisfaction survey. You may have thousands of customers, but you most likely have far fewer business partners.

Additionally, with the B2B questionnaire, you might even consider surveying more than one person at each business because multiple people might interact with your company.

In this article, let’s look at how to create a B2B client satisfaction questionnaire.

Questions to Ask

To help you create your survey, we’ve put together a list of questions for you to choose from.

Pick the ones that most pertain to your business, refine as needed and create your survey. Be sure to keep your survey short and succinct for the most responses.

  1. Are you currently working with us now?
  2. If not, is your work with us complete?
  3. How well did we handle your needs?
  4. Did we stick to your timeline?
  5. Did we meet your expectations?
  6. How likely are you to work with us (use our services) again?
  7. How likely are you to recommend our company to other businesses?
  8. Tell us about your experience with our billing department.
  9. Were you satisfied with our online ordering?

You can even get more specific asking questions about the ease of using your website, their telephone or email communications with your company, delivery issues and how they felt about their customer service representative.

To Conclude

To find out what your B2B customers think, ask them. Find out about their experience with your company and how they felt about your service.

Once you have those answers, you’ll know where you excel and where you have room to improve.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image: Olu Eletu

Top 8 Challenges with Designing Accurate Surveys
Survey Tips

Top 8 Challenges With Designing Accurate Surveys

Surveys are an effective way to collect data from your customers. They are helpful in evaluating your offerings and finding ways to make changes for the better.

Yet, some people struggle with survey design and creation and create surveys that aren’t giving them the most accurate results.

To help you learn how to generate the best surveys, we look at the top eight challenges with designing accurate surveys and provide you the solutions you need.

Challenge #1: Missing the Purpose

One of the biggest challenges with designing accurate surveys is knowing the purpose behind it or narrowing it down.

A poor survey will have questions that aren’t related and seemingly have no purpose.

The Solution:

The problem is solved by knowing the purpose of your survey. Before you start creating your survey, you want to ask yourself a few vital questions:

  • What do I need to know?
  • Why do I need to know it?
  • What will I do with my results?

Once you can answer these questions, the purpose of your survey will be clear, and with a clear purpose, more people are likely to complete your survey.

Challenge #2: Using Question Bias

The next thing we look at is the problem of question bias. This means that you are asking questions in such a way that you’ll get the answers you’re looking for.

In other words, you are “prompting” respondents.

For example, a political organization conducts a survey. To influence their results, they ask their questions in carefully crafted ways to elicit the answers they want.

The Solution:

Leading questions not only hurt your survey/poll results, but they also ruin your trustworthiness factor. (tweet  this)

The best way to avoid question bias is to take your emotions out of the survey. If you need, have someone else help you craft the questions so they aren’t leading respondents to a specific answer. Or, have others review your survey.

Challenge #3: Measuring Too Many Things

Along with the purpose of your survey, you have to know what you’re measuring and how.

If you don’t know this, you’ll end up measuring too many things or the wrong things, and it will be hard to analyze your data.

The Solution:

Deciding what to measure is in direct correlation to the objectives of your survey.

For example, if you want to learn about how respondents feel about your company and your customer service, you measure the net promoter score.

Know the purpose of your survey, and then decide what you want to measure. Don’t measure too many things at one time. This also helps you manage your data and helps ensure you can take action on your results.

Challenge #4: Using a Biased Selection

Why is selection bias a challenge when designing accurate surveys?

Selection bias is a problem because it shows responses that don’t reflect a representative sample of your population.

While you want a statistically valid sample size, you don’t want one that is too large and irrelevant. If your sample size is too large, the responses you get may not accurately reflect your targeted population.

For example, let’s say you try to survey people in a rural area by sending them an online survey. Your selection is biased because many of those people won’t have an Internet connection.

Or, you want to survey people with children, but you include singles and those without children.

The Solution:

To design an accurate survey and avoid selection bias, you must target a population that fits the goals of your survey.

You don’t want to include, or exclude, the wrong participants, or your data will be skewed.

Define your target population and stick with it. Make sure you have a clearly defined idea of what you want in a respondent. This helps you frame your survey in a more accurate way.

The source of your target group is much more important than the size of your group. A small group of 100 people who match your target will give you better data than 1000 random people who may have no frame of reference for your survey.

A final note – don’t forget to use disqualifying logic to filter out respondents who really aren’t part of your targeted sample population.

Challenge #5: Getting Duplicate Responses

Some people run into the issue of getting duplicate responses.

This skews your survey data because you have the same person completing your survey more than once.

How does this happen? It’s a common occurrence when surveys come with an incentive, and your respondents want more than one of what you’re offering.

Or, they may want to take your survey multiple times to increase their chances of winning your drawing or getting other benefits.

The Solution:

Solve the issue of duplicate responses by using vote protection so respondents can only take your survey one time.

Challenge #6: Creating a Lengthy Survey

When you create a survey that is too long, you have higher dropout rates, and this affects your response rates.

People are more likely to abandon a long, involved survey than one with just a few questions.

The Solution:

The best solution to this problem is to know your purpose and what you want to measure and then craft your questions.

Keep your survey to 10 questions or less. This usually means respondents can complete your survey in less than 10 minutes.

Challenge #7: Mixing Up Your Wording

Surveys with complicated wording are hard for people to complete. It’s also bad form to ask two questions in one.

Both of these issues don’t help you with accurate survey creation.

The Solution:

Be diligent when writing your questions.

For example, don’t ask two questions in one like this: “Do you like our tacos and our fajitas?” Regardless of the answer, you have no idea what they really like.

You also want to write clear, concise and simple questions. If respondents can’t understand your question, they can’t accurately answer it.

Bottom line – stick to one topic per sentence, use short sentences and don’t use technical jargon.

Challenge #8: Using Irrelevant Questions

If you ask irrelevant questions, you can count on an inaccurate survey.

Don’t ask respondents questions you don’t really care about or that have nothing to do with the purpose of your survey.

In addition, don’t include questions that don’t pertain to the respondent.

The Solution:

Avoid asking irrelevant questions by using the following as your guide:

  • Use question logic for consecutive questions. For example, if you ask a question, and the respondent answers “no,” don’t send them to the question for people who answered “yes.”
  • Don’t ask questions that move away from your purpose.
  • You also don’t want to include questions that you don’t intend to take action on.

To Conclude

We’ve looked at the top eight challenges with designing accurate surveys, and now you have our top solutions.

You’ll find that when you put these solutions to practice you end up with more accurate surveys and clean data. This helps you draw accurate conclusions that you can then act on for the betterment of your business.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image: Rohit Tandon

How Long Is Too Long - Keeping Your Survey to A Reasonable Length
Survey Tips

How Long Is Too Long? – Keeping Your Survey to A Reasonable Length

Is there a perfect survey length? How long is too long?

What is the point where respondents drop off? Is less really more?

We look at all of these questions in this article as we discuss keeping your survey to a reasonable length. Here’s how to use the right length to get the most responses.

Only Ask What You Need

Let’s say you want to ask your customers questions about several of your products, how they feel about your customer service and if they’re interested in a new product you’re thinking about launching.

Before you start creating a survey with all of these questions, ask yourself which one of these questions you are prepared to act on in the next few months.

Then, ask about just this one. That’s right, create your survey around one goal.

While you may have several questions in your survey, you want to keep it goal-centered and stick to one topic.

Then, in the future, you can send out a survey about one of your other topics.

By keeping your survey to a reasonable length, you’ll have more responses.

Be Brief

Brevity is a good thing not only in the number of survey questions, but in question length. (tweet this)

People today have a short attention span. If they have to read your question that spans two long sentences, they are more apt to drop out than if the question was one short sentence.

Short and simple is the way to go when crafting your questions.

Watch Out for Repeats

Read and re-read your survey before you send it out. Enlist family and friends to look it over, too.

Make sure you aren’t repeating yourself or asking the same question in different ways. Repeat-questions just increase your length.

Complete the Survey Before Sending

It’s a good idea to test drive your survey before sending.

Create your survey, sit down in front of your computer and pretend you are the respondent. Carefully read and answer each question, thinking about whether it’s really necessary.

Time the survey so you know how long it takes start to finish. Notice if you feel like dropping out before finishing. If so, ask yourself if the survey is too long, or if the question is wordy and confusing.

Be Upfront with People

Since you’ve taken your own survey, you know how long it takes to complete.

If it takes two minutes, tell them. If it takes 15 minutes, you want to let them know. It’s not a good idea to surprise respondents as they begin taking the test.

You can bet that people who think they’re taking a short survey are likely to drop out at the five-minute mark.

Set the expectations upfront. Then watch your response rates. If you find your customers are more likely to complete a four-minute survey than they are a seven-minute survey, plan accordingly in the future.

To Conclude

Short, focused surveys with just one objective tend to get the best response rates.

As you create your questions, do it with the customer in mind. You really want to know what they think, so respect their time and only send specific surveys. After all, you can always send another one at a later date.

Bottom line, your survey should take no longer than five minutes to complete. Time is a precious commodity, and you don’t want to take advantage of it.

This means you want to include less than 10 questions as a general guideline to improve your response rates.

Your customers will appreciate a shorter survey that’s quick to complete, and you’ll experience fewer drop outs.

Another benefit is that when you send additional surveys in the future, your customers know you appreciate their time, so they’ll be more apt to answer surveys down the road as well.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image: William Iven

How To Use Uploads As Part Of Your Surveys And Forms
Survey Tips

How To Use Uploads As Part Of Your Surveys And Forms

You’ll find there are many different types of questions to ask in a survey, and they each serve their purpose.

  • The dichotomous question is generally a “yes/no” question.
  • Users are encouraged to type their own response in the open-ended question.
  • The multiple-choice question allows users to pick from a variety of answers.
  • The rank order and ranking scale questions allow users to rank items.

But, what if you need more information than this?

This is where uploads come in.  You can use uploads as part of your surveys and forms.

How to Use Uploads

When you use uploads, you give respondents the ability to attach data that isn’t usually available through the above standard survey questions. (tweet this)

For example, a customer purchases your product, and you want to see it in action so you ask them to upload a photo. Or, perhaps you want respondents to upload a document like a resume. They could also do this with the file upload.

Even better, they can upload documents and photos through the survey on their phones.

Final Thoughts

With the extra feature of being able to use uploads as part of your surveys and forms, you can now collect additional information from respondents.

You make it easy for them to send you information they have in a digital format. This is especially helpful for respondents because they don’t have to type the information into your survey – they can just upload a file.

This survey question type is particularly beneficial when using mobile surveys. Your respondents can simply upload a photo or document from their mobile device to the survey.

It makes it easier for respondents to provide you with information while engaging them in the process.

You’ll find the files easy to access in Survey Town for your review. You now have access to even more data in your survey results.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Image via Visual Hunt.

7 Ways To Use Survey Data To Better Target Customers
Survey Tips

3 Ways To Use Survey Data To Better Target Customers

Targeting the right customers at the right time is essential to your company’s marketing plan. (tweet this)

To build an effective marketing strategy, you have to know the best ways to reach your customers as well as the right information to provide them.

When you start putting together your marketing plan, you begin by making decisions on who you think your target customers are, and then you put some time into gathering and analyzing their habits. This begins with the survey.

Using a survey to find out more about your target audience is a cost-effective way to change the game plan and increase your business growth.

In this article, we look at three ways to use survey data to better target customers. First, let’s look at why the survey is a good option.

Why Survey Target Customers?

It’s hard to connect with people if you only think you know what they need. There’s no need to guess any longer. Use a survey to effectively connect with your customers.

When you survey your current customers as well as members of your target market, you learn what they need and want. You learn how to better present your products and services.

You also learn where you might be lacking and how to improve.

Survey a large group of people, but stick to those you think might have some interest in what you’re offering. You can then use their data to better target new customers.

Once you know more about your target market, you can go about marketing to them.

Let’s look at a few ways to use survey results to help you further target contacts:

  • Integrate survey results with email list management
  • Improve customer retention rates
  • Incorporate results into your CRM

Email List Management

An added benefit of sending your customers surveys is that you let them know you really care about what they want and what they think.

Once you get your survey results back, you can use that data to segment your email list and send the right info to the right people at the right time.

You can also use the survey data to build better email campaigns. You can make them more specific and relevant to the people on your list.

This means people are more likely to open, read and click through your email campaigns.

When you gather vital data through your surveys and segment your lists, you can highly target your messages to subscribers, providing them the information that benefits them the most. In turn, you see a greater return on your investment.

Customer Retention

You can increase your customer retention rates by analyzing your survey data. Survey them to learn what they like and what they wish you’d do differently.

Here are some ideas to get you started. Survey your customers with these questions to learn where to concentrate your customer retention efforts:

Ask them what they link about discounts. Survey them to find out how big they’d like to see the discounts and how often. Ask them if they’d like a perks program that includes coupons or freebies. Find out if a loyalty rewards program would incentivize them to stick with you.

This takes all the guesswork out of your retention program. You may think you know what they want, but you won’t know for sure until you ask.

Ask them what new products or services they’d like to see. Once you know what their needs are, you can provide them just what they require.

This encourages them to stick with your company and lets them know you care what they need.

Ask them what they think of your service. The fastest way to lose a customer is with bad service. In fact, according to one source, 78% of consumers have bailed on a transaction or not made an intended purchase because of a poor service experience.

Knowing that 12 positive experiences are needed to make up for one unresolved negative experience shows just how important your service is.

You can’t be involved in every transaction, so the only way to know for sure what your customers think is to ask them. Surveys give your customers the opportunity to open up and share their experiences, giving you the chance to improve where needed and increase customer retention rates.

CRM Software Usage

Did you know you can use survey data in tandem with your CRM (Customer Relationship Management)?

How well you use your CRM is completely dependent on how much you know about your customers and your target market.

The more you know, the better the relationships you can create.

Surveys are a great way to maximize the data you use in your CRM to make it really work for your business.

When you combine your survey data with the automated benefits of your CRM, you can use your market research to build sales strategies that work better for your business.

Surveys can help you qualify your leads better because you learn more about what makes your customers tick. You can gather demographic information as well as their interests and needs.

Survey data helps keep your contact information fresh and relevant while helping you further segment your customers for the best in targeted information.

You can also use your survey data to catch any problems before they get worse. You do this by integrating your CRM software with online surveys. This helps you automate feedback to your customers at various touch-points.

Consider surveying them after they purchase, following a customer service call, when they cancel your service or return a product, or when they buy again.

You’ll have a better grasp on your strengths and weaknesses using this survey data to use your CRM better.

You can also send automated replies when customers give you negative survey feedback. Consider an “I’m sorry” message to make your customer feel better.

Final Thoughts

You’ll find there are many ways to use survey data to better target customers.

It can only help jump start your marketing strategy and help fill in the questions you might have about your target audience.

Use your surveys to enhance your email marketing, customer retention efforts and your CRM, and you’ll end up with happier, more engaged customers who truly appreciate your business.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

Images: William Iven