survey respondents

How to Know If You Have “Good Survey Questions”

Survey Tips

You’ve done your research. You’ve drafted your questions, and you think you’re ready to send your survey.

But, how do you know it’s good enough to elicit the kinds of responses you need?

While online survey tools make it easy to send surveys, you still need to do the legwork and create a survey that actually works. This requires careful planning.

Without it, you may not get the meaningful data you’re looking for.

To help you evaluate your survey, in this article, we look at how to know if you have “good survey questions.”

Take a look at the following and then look at your survey questions. If they meet these qualifications, you have good survey questions.

Have a Goal

Do you have a goal for your survey? It’s best practice to have a goal in mind before you start crafting your survey questions.

For example, ask yourself about the objective of your survey. What’s the most important thing you want to know? What else are you looking for?

Once you have your goal, you can craft questions to go with it.

Keep It Simple

We can almost promise you that your customers won’t answer long surveys (unless the reward is overly beneficial).

Because of this, you want to keep your survey as simple as possible. If your survey is simple, and short, you’re more likely to have a larger pool or respondents.

People are busy, and you want to provide them easy access to your survey. Make sure they can complete your survey in under 10 minutes. (tweet this)

If you want to ensure the best results, keep your survey well under five minutes. Show your respondents you care and respect their time, otherwise your abandonment rate will skyrocket. 

Stay Away from Yes/No Questions

Otherwise known as a polar question, the yes/no question in most instances isn’t going to provide you much data.

With this question there are only two possible answers, and that is all you’re going to get.

You leave your respondents without a voice. They can’t tell you what they think, and they have no other choice by yes or no. It may be they are somewhere in between.

What’s more, this question is leading. If your respondent isn’t squarely in the yes or no corner, they are forced to pick one of those answers, creating bias.

You’re after real, authentic data, and the polar question isn’t the way to get it.

If you are really set on a closed-ended type of question like this, at least give your respondents multiple items to choose from. The multiple choice question is certainly a better option because you are giving them more choices.

In addition, you may also want to include a line for “other,” so they can add their own answer. After all, you may not have thought of all possible answers. 

Use the Right Type of Question

When working with surveys, you’ll note there are many different types of questions.

In order to get the best data, you want to use the right type of question.

Qualitative questions are open-ended. Use these types of questions when you want a written answer.

Quantitative questions are closed-ended, and you offer options for respondents. These may include:

  • Check boxes
  • Drop down menus
  • Radio buttons
  • Rating scales
  • Ranking scales

Often, you’ll find that a mix of questions is ideal for your needs. You might even follow up with an open-ended question after a respondent answers a closed-ended question in a particular way.

Use Open-Ended Questions

This type of question can be very valuable because your respondents provide a comment. It can be one sentence or many and often gives you insight into how your survey respondents really feel about your business or your products.

The open-ended question allows you to really dig deep for data.

As we just mentioned, not all of your questions have to be open-ended nor should they be. Consider one or two open-ended questions so as not to overly tax your respondents. 

Do be careful when wording this question. You want to ensure you aren’t leading respondents to a particular answer. 

Ask One Thing in Each Question

This is a problem that derails many survey writers.

It happens when someone writes a question that actually includes more than one question. For example:

  • Do you like product x? What is your favorite thing about it? How is it beneficial?

Not only are you asking too many similar questions, but you’re confusing your respondents.

If it was open-ended, you might expect to only get one of your questions answered.  If it was closed-ended, your respondents wouldn’t know what to answer, so your data will be skewed.

Each question should pose only one thing. Don’t make it hard for respondents to answer you accurately and precisely.

You might reword the above example like this: “What do you find most beneficial about product x?”

Don’t Use Leading Words

Great writers know that words can have very different meanings depending on their context.

Good survey writers are aware of the same nuances.

In order to get the most precise data from your survey, be very careful with your wording. Make sure your questions aren’t leading and that they say exactly what you mean.

Have others look over your questions to see if they interpret them differently than you meant them.

Avoid Double-Barreled Questions

Similar to the leading question, this one shows great bias.

For example, if you own a hotel, a double-barreled question might look like this: “Is our hotel your favorite place to stay?” Or, “What is the most economical hotel for you to stay at?”

Not only are these questions leading, but in the case of the last question, one person’s economical isn’t always the same as another. 

Final Thoughts

Some sources attribute the following to Albert Einstein, “If I had an hour to solve a problem, and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first 55 minutes determining the proper question to ask… for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.”

As you craft your survey and look for good survey questions that produce the best data, consider this quote.

If you ask the right questions and in the right manner, you’re sure to get the data you’re looking for to meet your overall goals. 

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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Understanding Your Survey Results

Survey Tips

You’ve done your due diligence and created a simple, data-rich survey, and the results are pouring in.

Now what?

It’s time to review your survey responses. In this article, we look at understanding your survey results and how to move forward with them.

Display Your Results Visually

The human brain processes visual images 60,000 times faster than it does text.

So, take your data and put it into an image-based format. Think tables and graphs. This makes it easier not only for you, but for the rest of your team, to interpret the results.

Consider tables when looking at precise numbers or when you have just a few comparisons. Use graphs and other imagery when you have more to compare.

Ignore the Outliers

Once you have your survey data in a visually appealing format, you can concentrate on the high points. This means look at the biggest trends and for the initial discussion, ignore the outliers.

At first glance, you’re after the big picture of the data. For example, 15 respondents answered a question the same way, while two people didn’t. Save those outliers for a later discussion because they might even be mistakes.

You don’t want to miss the big picture because you focused on the smallest survey responses. (tweet this)

Use the Data Wisely

Let’s say you conducted a survey, and you wanted 100 responses, but you only got 10.

If your survey was about something as important as a major product change, you might want to send out a few more surveys a respectable time apart to be sure the data is correct.

If you do this, consider revising your survey and asking the question in a new way to elicit more responses.

Once you find your survey data correlates with one another, you can feel safe moving forward with your business change.

Final Thoughts

The best surveys are simple and specific with data that you can take action on. They begin with a well-crafted survey and end with a thorough examination of your survey results.

Finally, before you create your survey, write down its purpose along with what you think you’ll find. Then, you’ll have better results and something to compare them to.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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How To Filter Survey Reports

Survey Tips

When you conduct a survey, you may want to look at your survey from several different angles. Filtering your results can help you do this.

In this article, we look at how to filter survey reports into your report so you can segment your respondents according to how they answered your questions.

Slice and Dice the Data

Using filters in SurveyTown, you can get multiple views of your data by going to the Reporting Tab and using “Filter Results.”

This allows you to compare results based on different groups of respondents. By clicking on “Filter Results,” you can view various data. Simply go step-by-step and choose various data points to filter your responses.

Not only can you filter data by responses, but you can filter it by age, demographic, gender, ratings and more. You will have had to ask for this information in your survey, though, to be able to filter it.

It’s often helpful to explore the similarities and the differences between subgroups in your audience. This helps you identify your strengths, weaknesses and even opportunities. (tweet this) For example, you may find audience members of a certain age rated you five stars when you only expected three of this particular group.

Finally, here are a few suggestions for filtering your survey results. You can filter by:

  • Survey status
  • Response date
  • Question Answers
  • Age and/or Demographics
  • Survey Link – where they accessed your survey

Final Thoughts

You’ll find filtering your survey results beneficial for several reasons.

First, it provides you with more in-depth data and reports on how certain parts of your target populations answered specific questions. Second, filtering your results let you segment your respondents for further communication.

For example, you might filter all the people who answered question number three negatively and send them a follow-up email to try and make things right. Or, if you asked a question pertaining to a potential new product, you could filter out the responses that indicated they’d like to learn more.

Ready to get started filtering your survey results? Head on over to SurveyTown.

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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How To Survey Your Customers “Where They Are”

Survey Tips

Many of our customers ask us, “How do I get more responses from my surveys?”

One of our suggestions is to make it as easy as possible for respondents to access and complete your survey.

To help you get more responses, we look at how to survey your customers “where they are.”

First, let’s look at why it’s important to stay in touch with your current customers and their satisfaction levels.

Customer Retention is Vital

In today’s busy, ultra-digital world, it costs at least five times more to acquire a new customer than to retain current ones. For some businesses, the cost of losing a customer amounts to several hundred dollars.

While that doesn’t sound like a lot for one customer, imagine the cost for each five customers you lose – well over $1000.

This is where the customer survey comes in. It allows you to measure customer satisfaction, fix problems in your business, and ultimately retain more customers.

Now let’s look at how to survey your customers where they are by integrating surveys into your daily business activities.

Use Surveys During the Sales Process

We think this is one of the most effective ways to survey your customers and find out more about their interactions with your business.

By integrating customer satisfaction surveys into your sales process, you meet customers right where they are. You can send your survey post-purchase through your email list, or you can even link it from your checkout pages. (tweet this)

It’s advantageous to survey your customers early in their sales cycle during the sales process because it’s fresh in their minds. It also shows your customers that you truly care about customer service.

Early surveys tell your customers their satisfaction is important to you. It pays to let your customers know you are willing to go above and beyond to handle any issues or problems.

Send Surveys Multiple Ways

You know your business best, so you probably know the best avenue for sending surveys. If you don’t know, it’s time to learn where you customers spend their time.

Is it on email, in your app or on their phones? The good news is that you can survey them in any of those places.

Email provides a chance for highly qualitative feedback. Why? This is because the people who respond to email surveys usually care because they are invested in your brand.

These folks are likely to take your survey one step further and even provide answers to your open-ended questions.

Using surveys through your website or mobile app often provide higher response rates, although your responses might not be of the caliber of your email ones.

Customers will usually answer your questions, though, and are less likely to opt out.

When you send surveys out through SMS (text messaging), you’ll find these are an effective and immediate way to interact with your customers.

Text messages beg for a response, and you’ll find your customers more eager to answer short, specific surveys.

Bottom line – it’s not about which method is better. It’s about which channels are the best for your customer base. Where are your customers? Know the answer to this question and meet them where they are.

Review Responses Regularly

We often see businesses who get excited to send surveys, spend a great deal of time crafting questions and putting the survey together, only to shelve their results for “another day.”

Best practice says you should review your customer surveys on a schedule and on an ongoing basis. For example, set aside 30 minutes to review survey data and results at your monthly staff meetings.

By dedicating yourself and your entire team to reviewing customer surveys on a regular business, you create a customer-service oriented culture at your business.

It helps hold everyone accountable, and it gets your team onboard with improving customer service at your business.

In addition, by reviewing survey data at staff meetings, you might find that your team can identify specific customers and elaborate on why they responded the way they did.

For example, if a customer gave you bad rating, or if they left comments, you can discuss this with your team to learn more about any problems and how you can keep them from happening in the future.

You can also use this information to brainstorm on ways to solve problems, and oftentimes respond to customers to try to repair any damage.

Do be careful when sharing survey results with your staff to not make them uncomfortable with the results. Your survey review sessions shouldn’t be “blame games.”

Stay open to listening to your staff members while coaching them to provide better customer service.

Review Surveys with Customers

For businesses who have relationships with their customers and provide a long-term service or product, it can be helpful to meet with them at least once a year to discuss survey results.

This provides you the ability to meet with your customers in person to discuss their survey responses and dig deeper into any issues that may exist.

Go through their answers to learn more and improve your process. You might find that this review process coupled with the initial survey smooths ruffled feathers and may prevent customer loss.

Final Thoughts

You already know that listening to your customers and meeting their needs is key to your success as a business.

Customer surveys are a terrific way to learn more about how your customers feel about you, so you can use the data to improve your company.

But, perhaps you are struggling with how, where and when to survey your customers.

The best way to solve that problem is to survey them where they are. This might be a pop-up survey on your website at the right time in the customer journey, it might be a post-purchase email or a link on the checkout page. Perhaps it’s a text with a link included.

With more options than ever before, you can meet your customers needs and your own by surveying them where they are.

Increasing your response rate gives you a clearer picture for managing and improving your customer service while at the same time improving retention and raising profit levels. 

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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Why Embedding Questions Gets More Survey Results

Survey Tips

One of the best ways to increase your survey response rates is to embed the questions right in your email marketing software.

Why does this increase your response rate? You see higher response rates because your respondents don’t have to leave their email to take your survey. They can answer it right in the virtual comfort of their inbox.

This is different than putting a link in your email, and it eliminates an extra step for survey takers.

In this article we look at why embedding questions gets more survey results.

Why are Response Rates Higher?

Response rates for emails with embedded survey questions are often higher for several reasons:

  1. As your respondent clicks to answer your question, they have already invested their time and are compelled to complete your survey. There is less chance of large dropout rates.
  2. Your respondents are more likely to answer a single question in your email than invest the time to click through to a long survey.

What is the Best Question?

Surveys embedded in emails generally see a much higher response rate than when you send a link to your survey. (tweet this)

Because of this, you want to ask the question that is the most important to your company. In many instances, this would be your Net Promoter question, “How likely are you to recommend our business to others.”

You’re sure to come up with other one-question surveys that fit your needs, but it’s a good idea to keep embedded surveys to no more than three questions.

Final Thoughts

Email is a powerful vehicle for your surveys. Nearly everyone checks their email, and by embedding your survey questions right in your email, you increase your chances of a response.

Embedding the survey reduces a perceived barrier to completing the survey. Your respondents can complete it immediately upon opening their email. They don’t have to click a link away from their email and take extra steps to complete your survey.

This is a bonus for your business and can help you learn more from your surveys while making it easier for your customers. 

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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How To Integrate Survey Results Into Your CRM

Survey Tips

When you take the time to survey your customers and really listen to what they have to say, you want to make that survey data work for you.

One way to do this is to integrate your survey with your CRM (Client Relationship Management) tool.

Why is this important? It helps you get your survey data into the right place while it’s at its most valuable. Survey integration with your CRM helps you improve your sales.

In this article, we look at how to integrate survey results into your CRM. First, let’s look more at the CRM.

The Customer Relationship Management Tool

Your CRM helps you build solid and successful relationships with your current customers as well as your potential ones.

You probably already know there are many ways to use your CRM software to your benefit. Yet, perhaps something is missing.

This is where the survey comes in. Your CRM is only as successful as the quality of information stored in its database.

You also know that one of the best ways to learn what your customers and your leads want and need is through a survey. Even more, you know that data isn’t worth much unless you first analyze it and then act on it.

When you import your survey data into the CRM, you add your valuable results, so you can use the information to further market to your customers and prospects in the most effective manner possible.

Your survey software and your CRM complement one another. This integration lets you combine multiple pieces of information about your customers into one system.

This in turn makes it easier for you to grow your business by managing the customer relationship in one place.

Now, lets look at the ways you can use the integration.

Work with Your Personas

Buyer personas are semi-fictional representations of what your ideal customer looks like based on market research and real-time data of your current customers.

Personas help you create and deliver a better marketing strategy. They provide you a clear picture of the type of person who would be interested in doing business with you. Creating buyer personas helps you target the right people at the right time.

Your surveys can help you uncover the following information to create better buyer personas:

  • Demographic info
  • Behavioral data and patterns
  • Geographic information
  • The purchasing process of certain groups of people
  • Customer profiles

When you take this survey data and add it to your CRM, you have very specific buyer personas and can create marketing strategies to meet their needs.

In other words, you can execute marketing strategies based on the customer profiles or buyer personas that you create from your survey data.

You’ll also boost your sales in the process.

Improve Customer Service

One of the most important markers of your success as a business is your Net Promoter Score.

When you provide the best customer care, you encourage customer loyalty and retention. You also have brand ambassadors who’ll share their good dealings with your business to their family and friends.

Integrating your CRM with your survey results allows you to get better data on your Net Promoter Score in relation to your customer transactions and interactions.

When you integrate, you can use your Net Promoter Score (NPS) survey results in your CRM to:

  • Trigger an automated response for follow-up with your customers
  • Ask customers who gave you a favorable NPS to give you a Google review
  • Reach out to customers who rated you negatively on the NPS survey immediately. This helps you preempt any negative online reviews they might have and turn the situation around.

Learn More About Current Customers

If you want to run a successful business, it pays to listen to your customers.

By sending a survey, you’ve already shown a willingness to do just that. You’ve given your customers a voice and invited them to share their experience with you.

They are able to respond positively or negatively. They can tell you more about what they want and need. They can tell you about their negative experiences in a non-threatening forum.

When you ask your customers what they think and integrate your survey data into your CRM, you learn the following information:

  • What makes your customer stay with your business
  • How to retain your customers
  • What encourages their loyalty
  • More about their needs and desires
  • Description of your target market
  • Minimize the chance of negative online feedback because you handle it as it comes in

With this integration, you can rest assured that your CRM has the most up-to-date information about your customers.

You can also learn more about the customer’s journey with your business and then create surveys to match the journey.

Maximize the Moment

Sometimes it can be hard to know the exact right time to make a customer contact to make the sale.

But, when you use your surveys to learn more about your customers, you can use the survey data and your CRM to get the right information in front of particular customers at just the right time.

For example, you send out a survey to your leads and ask them what products or services they want to learn more about.

Once the survey is returned, you can trigger just the right automated email string.

Final Thoughts

The best part of integrating your survey results into your CRM is the ability it gives you to attract new customers and retain current ones.

This integration helps you facilitate a long-term relationship with your customers by providing the data you need for personal marketing.

You’ll find that by integrating your survey results into your CRM, you have smart data to make even smarter decisions.

Your feedback and your marketing opportunities come full circle because you have all of your information in one system.

You know the value and potential value of a wide range of customer types based on their survey data.

Above all, survey and CRM integration helps you connect the dots for the most informative picture of current and potential customers. (tweet this)

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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The Pros & Cons of Letting Survey Takers Remain Anonymous

Survey Tips

You’ve created an engaging survey and paid attention to all the best practices. It’s time to send it out, and suddenly you aren’t sure what to do.

Should you require respondents to leave their names, or should you let them remain nameless?

In this article, we look at the pros and cons of letting survey takers remain anonymous.

Pros of Anonymous Surveys

You’ll often find that anonymous surveys can provide for more honest feedback.

The nature of a nameless survey means that respondents can answer freely without fear of reprisals or embarrassment.

Anonymous surveys work well for topics that are deeply personal and allow people to respond openly and honestly.

Cons of Anonymous Surveys

On the flip side, anonymous surveys may be less specific. You may find that if negative feedback is involved, it’s broad-based because you can’t follow-up to learn more.

In addition, if the survey is anonymous, you might not have a frame of reference for the respondents’ complaints, so you can’t be completely sure of the whole picture.

Another negative is that respondents don’t have to “own” an anonymous survey. If they have to give their name, they must also be able to stand behind their feedback and defend it.

Without ownership, your data may not always be accurate.

Final Thoughts

Once you’ve weighed the pros and cons of letting survey takers remain anonymous, you can decide which route to take.

If you’re on the fence, consider letting your survey takers decide. Give them the choice of answering their questions openly or anonymously. Do this at the start of the survey for the best results.

Finally, if you’re wondering about survey results, a university study shows that non-anonymous survey respondents are more likely to provide extra detail in their responses as opposed to anonymous responders.

This also shows that feedback quality actually can improve once the anonymity is removed. (tweet this)

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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9 Of The Most Common Survey Questions

Survey Tips

Wondering what your customers think of your business, your staff, and your product and services? The best way to find out is through a survey.

Surveys help you gather data and analyze it so you can take action if necessary. They have the ability to help you increase your business while strengthening your relationship with your customers.

To help you make the most out of your next survey, we look at nine of the most common survey questions and review their effectiveness. 

#1: The Open-Ended Survey Question

The open-ended survey question is perhaps the most effective survey question because it provides you with the most information. (tweet this)

With this question, the sky’s the limit when it comes to answers.

You use the open-ended survey question when you really want to dig deep into how your respondents feel about your company, your brand, your products and services, and your customer service and staff.

This question allows respondents to answer the question in as much detail as they want.

#2: The Dichotomous Question

Generally speaking, this is the common yes or no question.

For example, you might ask, “Have you used our products in the last year?”

Respondents are then given the option to simply answer yes or no.

As for the effectiveness of this type of question, it’s beneficial if the only answer you want is yes or no. If you want to screen respondents out and send them on or dump them out of your survey, this question works.

Many people use this type of question to make sure only “qualified” people are taking their survey.

In the above example, you’d respond to survey takers who answered no, they haven’t used your products, with a thank you message and the end of the survey.

Those who answered yes, they have used your products, would continue on.

#3: The Multiple-Choice Question

Another common survey question is the multiple-choice question that consists of three or more answer choices.

With this question, you might ask respondents which products or services they’ve used. For example, the question might be “What is your favorite product of ours that you’ve used in the last year?”

You would then give them three-ten choices and they choose one.

We recommend adding in an “other” category for certain questions to make sure you cover all your bases.

Like the dichotomous question, this is also a good question for which you can use conditional logic. Depending on their answer, you can send them off into various directions to answer different survey trains.

#4: The Rating Scale Question

A very common type of survey question, the rating scale asks survey respondents to rate their experiences.

It might be a product, a service or how the customer felt about something. The key to this question is a scale, usually from something that was very bad to very good.

This question is effective if you just want to know how your customer perceives your product or service.

The most common form of ratings question uses the Likert Scale. When responding to this question, your survey participants specify their level of agreement or disagreement.

#5: The Rank Order Question

You’ve probably answered this type of question many times.

With the rank order question, you might list five of the services you offer and ask respondents to rank them in order of their usefulness.

This question is effective in that it allows you to prioritize your marketing dollars into the services that people find the most valuable.

#6: The Demographic Question

Common and important, most surveys include the demographic questions.

Why do you want to ask these questions? They’re vital to the data you collect.

With the demographic survey questions, you learn the age, gender, income, race, geographical location, number of children, education level and much more of your respondents.

This helps you filter your results by demographic items.

For example, you might find that most of your respondents with children feel differently about your products than those without. Or, you might learn that people at a certain income level had a different experience with your service than others.

You have a more accurate view of your respondents once you have demographic data. This helps you understand your customer and in turn market to them more effectively.

#7: The Single Select Question

This type of question allows you to ask your respondents to choose from preconfigured options. In this instance, they only choose one.

For example, you ask, “What is your favorite food?” They can choose from pizza, burgers, steak and chicken fingers, but they are only allowed to select one.

Based on this answer, if you own a restaurant, you might add more of this type of food to your menu.

This is a closed or forced-choice question. It’s effective when you want very specific data.

#8: The Multi Select Question

This is just like the single select question, except your respondents can choose as many options as they’d like.

In the previous example, if you made it multi select, respondents could choose each one of your food items.

This question can be effective if a broad amount of data is acceptable.

#9: The Semantic Differential Scale Question

Another type of ratings question, this common survey question asks respondents to rate your company, service or product using a seven-point scale. At each opposing end is a completely opposite description.

For example, one choice would be very likely, while the other choice would be very unlikely. Respondents would choose on the scale of seven, from 1 being very unlikely to seven being very likely.

This question is perhaps not the most effective because the middle ground is very vague.

To Conclude

Now that you know nine of the most common survey questions and their level of effectiveness, you’re ready to start building your survey.

Before you do, though, here are a few more tips to building the perfect and most successful survey.

  1. Know your objective. Narrow down what you want to know from your customers and what you’re willing and able to take action on. Then, tailor your survey around this topic only.
  2. Keep your survey short. For the best data, keep your survey to no more than five minutes. This generally means asking fewer than 10 questions.
  3. Include a balance of closed-ended and open-ended questions and make sure the question style fits your query.
  4. Ask only one thing per question. If you ask two things in one question, you end up with skewed data, and you confuse your respondents.
  5. Be careful of question bias. Have others proof your survey before sending it out to avoid leading and biased questions.

Finally, do take action on your survey results and let your respondents know what you learned from the survey and what you intend to do about it. 

Surveys help you make the best decisions for your business. Are you ready to get started with your free Survey Town trial? Start with your free account today, and you can upgrade at any time.

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